luawitz

Now I'm gonna scratch my eyes out.

I don’t really know how he worked as a director. I don’t really have a sense of him working as a director, I’m not even sure I’ve ever really worked with a director. I wouldn’t know how to compare him to anybody else. He worked with all of us, everybody he worked with, his camera crew, his design crew and his you know his sound crew and his performers, in exactly the same way as he worked with his financiers… his bank manager.He just, he brought us all together in order to make something and then we all just figured it out.So that I’m sure is going to be very annoying for people to hear cos they’re going to think that it might be possible to be more precise but I don’t really know how to be more precise.He was a painter and he knew how to work in a solitary way… He was first and foremost a painter.
-Tilda Swinton on Derek Jarman

I don’t really know how he worked as a director. I don’t really have a sense of him working as a director, I’m not even sure I’ve ever really worked with a director. I wouldn’t know how to compare him to anybody else. He worked with all of us, everybody he worked with, his camera crew, his design crew and his you know his sound crew and his performers, in exactly the same way as he worked with his financiers… his bank manager.He just, he brought us all together in order to make something and then we all just figured it out.So that I’m sure is going to be very annoying for people to hear cos they’re going to think that it might be possible to be more precise but I don’t really know how to be more precise.He was a painter and he knew how to work in a solitary way… He was first and foremost a painter.

-Tilda Swinton on Derek Jarman

(Source: communicants)

Zizek on Tarkovsky’s Stalker

The Pervert’s Guide To Cinema (2006), dir. by Sophie Fiennes

(Source: lobstrocities, via communicants)


Land of Milk and Honey (Pierre Etaix, 1971)

Land of Milk and Honey (Pierre Etaix, 1971)

(Source: communicants)


 Les Maîtres du temp (Rene Laloux, 1982)

(Source: communicants)

At a psychological level, the film is very much about experiencing life. And experiencing life does not just mean experience of the present conscious but also the imagined future (i.e. what could have been if certain things had occurred), what you long for, your dreams, your souvenirs and, more importantly, the acknowledgement of reality being everything else that you cannot see or experience. So, you know that I am here and the moment we hang up I will be eating with my family and you too. We wouldn’t be able to acknowledge or understand that in reality, so that level which is rarely talked about but is so obvious is there too. And that’s why the rugby is there in the [final scene of] of the film. I don’t understand why people got so confused with that. It’s the equivalent of reading the end of a children’s fairytale saying “they lived happily ever after” and the kingdom survived.

-Carlos Reygadas

[via]

(Source: communicants)